2

DICOM files (e.g. from CT scans) contain raditation related data. I think this is the relevant section in the standard.

Here's an excerpt from such a DICOM file:

(0018, 0022) Scan Options                        CS: 'HELICAL MODE'
(0018, 0050) Slice Thickness                     DS: '0.2871089876'
(0018, 0060) KVP                                 DS: '120'
(0018, 0090) Data Collection Diameter            DS: '500.000000'
(0018, 1016) Secondary Capture Device Manufactur LO: 'GE MEDICAL SYSTEMS'
(0018, 1018) Secondary Capture Device Manufactur LO: 'Volume Viewer'
(0018, 1019) Secondary Capture Device Software V LO: '10.5.10'
(0018, 1020) Software Version(s)                 LO: 'kl_dod.10'
(0018, 1030) Protocol Name                       LO: '4.2 Ellenbogen**'
(0018, 1110) Distance Source to Detector         DS: '949.075000'
(0018, 1111) Distance Source to Patient          DS: '541.000000'
(0018, 1130) Table Height                        DS: '65.500000'
(0018, 1140) Rotation Direction                  CS: 'CW'
(0018, 1150) Exposure Time                       IS: '1980'
(0018, 1151) X-Ray Tube Current                  IS: '120'
(0018, 1152) Exposure                            IS: '13'
(0018, 1160) Filter Type                         SH: 'BODY FILTER'
(0018, 1170) Generator Power                     IS: '14400'
(0018, 1190) Focal Spot(s)                       DS: '0.700000'
(0018, 1210) Convolution Kernel                  SH: 'BONEPLUS'
(0018, 5100) Patient Position                    CS: 'FFP'

Is it possible to derive the radiation exposure (in Sievert) from these parameters?

1

I would say no, because Sievert is defined as Joule/kg (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sievert). I cannot find the patient weight or mass irradiated in the provided data.

| improve this answer | |
  • Could the exposure be calculated if the patient weight is known? – Danilo Bargen Jul 11 at 10:22

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