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I currently am trying to understand Tinnitus and am having issues with it, because I can't find an official source to see exactly what sort of sound frequency, if heard too often would cause the damage.

Does one type of frequency, if heard too often at too high volume trigger it?

EDIT: I know from sources that loud noise is a potential cause but can't find the reference that stated a certain frequency might be to blame. This is upsetting, Internets. As far as I know, though low frequency (bass) causes Tinnitus more often than high pitched sounds.

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  • Could you add a citation to which part you're referring to?
    – kenorb
    Apr 14 '15 at 18:04
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Different hairs cells in inner ear (cochlea) vibrate in various ways in respond to different sound frequencies.

The hairs vibrate in various ways in respond to the resonance in the cochlear fluid.

Small temporary changes or damages in the outer hair cells of the cochlea can trigger the emergence of tinnitus by increasing the gain of the central auditory system2004.

Most patients (both tinnitus and hearing loss) reports that the frequency of the tinnitus correlates with the severity and frequency characteristics of their hearing loss and that intensity of the tinnitus is usually less than 10dB above the patient's hearing threshold at that frequency2004

However the risk of hearing loss is not related to specific sound frequency, but rather to sound pressure (loudness) as it's stated in the article which you linked:

Exposure to loud noise. Loud noises, such as those from heavy equipment, chain saws and firearms, are common sources of noise-related hearing loss. Portable music devices, such as MP3 players or iPods, also can cause noise-related hearing loss if played loudly for long periods. Tinnitus caused by short-term exposure, such as attending a loud concert, usually goes away; long-term exposure to loud sound can cause permanent damage.

Tinnitus is one of the most important symptoms that can signal the onset of acoustic trauma.

Those exposed to over 85 decibels of sound continually are at a higher risk for acoustic trauma. In other words, the ear can be exposed to short periods in excess of 120dB without permanent harm (having discomfort and possibly pain), however long term exposure to sound levels over 80dB can cause permanent hearing lossOSHA.

According to Occupational Safety & Health Administration: Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR), these noise levels are permissible noise exposures:

______________________________________________________________
                            |
  Duration per day, hours   | Sound level dBA slow response
____________________________|_________________________________
                            |
8...........................|                    90
6...........................|                    92
4...........................|                    95
3...........................|                    97
2...........................|                   100
1 1/2 ......................|                   102
1...........................|                   105
1/2 ........................|                   110
1/4  or less................|                   115
____________________________|________________________________

When the daily noise exposure is composed of two or more periods of noise exposure of different levels, their combined effect should be considered, rather than the individual effect of each.

Exposure to impulsive or impact noise should not exceed 140 dB peak sound pressure level.

Read more:

See also: When does the use of headphones become harmful?

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