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Having type 1 diabetes for a little over a decade now I've never worn an identification to help others know of my condition especially in case of emergencies (such as hypoglycemic attacks - paramedics giving me resuscitation instead of simply giving me glucose).

The problem is that there isn't enough talk on this issue especially in the aesthetics of wearing one, as they look unfitting.

As far as best practices, I think a wristband is the most common method as it's effective (easy to locate). Either I proceed with a Do-It-Yourself initiative to create my own or find some cool looking ones to purchase.

Things to consider:

  • How often does the ID have to be replaced?
  • Should it be waterproof?
  • What material serves best for long term use (if this is preferred)
  • Should the medical info be stylized as engraved or placed as an attachment?
  • It's hard to find ones that actually look cool/neat/practical.

UPDATE

[SOLVED_EasilyAccessibleStandardLogoNoGlitter]

What ever makes the responder identify the situation quickly enough will help in the worst case scenario or for an emergency. So, for my question what type of accessory would make it easier to identify this particular type of situation? Ideally a bracelet is the best option. Otherwise, if a bracelet can't be worn then it would be appropriate to use a necklace instead.

Just make sure the I.D.'s design isn't straying too far away from how medical logos are displayed. Since we are talking about a standard procedure the medical logo (or the Snack-on-a-Pole / SOS) must be visible to any peripheral vision.

Thanks to @PETE, I was now able to understand the importance of speed to acknowledge responders to take the appropriate action for person(s) in danger. This is because they were able to locate the information needed as-fast-as-possible without any fuss or delay.

Now, I just wonder if people ever considered using a Tattoo for this case....

  • There is no danger of paramedics mistaking hypoglycemia for something else. Checking blood sugar is one of the first things they'll do for someone found unconscious for unknown reasons who is breathing and has a pulse. However, the information is still vital for them and the hospital to have because it answers the question of why your blood sugar is so low. – Carey Gregory Feb 9 '17 at 16:46
  • Personally, I use this bracelet! dhresource.com/200x200s/… – hichame.yessou Jul 9 '18 at 17:02
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I am a trained first aider.

I note that this question was asked a long time ago and has never been answers.

The majority of ID/Health alert lockets should indeed be waterproof (this would either the case or the information it contains). Otherwise, it's pretty much useless.

First aiders are trained to look for lockets that have the "snake on a pole" or "SOS" design prominently in view. Anything over-stylised would be easily overlooked. I guess it might well be obvious, but the information held within an SOS locket needs to be updated as soon the information changes, or it becomes illegible.

I'd also go for a bracelet - as a male first aider, I wouldn't be comfortable looking into a woman's cleavage for a pendant.

Obviously, the key thing is that people who are commonly around you (friends/co-workers) should be aware of your condition and any likely conditions you might have. Background information really does help a first aider, even if they do need to put a little work into confirming what's actually happening.

  • An EMT won't hesitate to look for a pendant on an unconscious woman. She needs help more than modesty. But for the first aid-level of first responder, there's not much that's going to be on that pendant that would change your course of action, so it may be wise to skip that step unless you're wearing something that clearly identifies your status as a first responder. – Carey Gregory Feb 9 '17 at 16:42
  • @CareyGregory - I'm sure your right. Of course, as a first responder, I'd be looking to maintain the patient's dignity for anything other than use of an AED (and if there was an AED qualified female first aider on hand, I'd hand that over). With a case of hypoglycaemia, I'd hope to get there before a coma set in and offer the "quick win" solution. An unresponsive patient would get a clear airway and an ambulance as a matter of course. – user7159 Feb 9 '17 at 17:52
  • If you need a defib then all decorum gets tossed. Whoever's closest gets that chest exposed and the bra cut off -- now. It doesn't matter who does it or who the witnesses are. Really. That stuff just doesn't matter and nobody cares, most certainly not the patient or her loved ones. So don't worry about that once it's a life and death matter. – Carey Gregory Feb 10 '17 at 6:25
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[SOLVED_EasilyAccessibleStandardLogoNoGlitter]

What ever makes the responder identify the situation quickly enough will help in the worst case scenario or for an emergency. So, for my question what type of accessory would make it easier to identify this particular type of situation? Ideally a bracelet is the best option. Otherwise, if a bracelet can't be worn then it would be appropriate to use a necklace instead.

Just make sure the I.D.'s design isn't straying too far away from how medical logos are displayed. Since we are talking about a standard procedure the medical logo (or the Snack-on-a-Pole / SOS) must be visible to any peripheral vision.

Thanks to @PETE, I was now able to understand the importance of speed to acknowledge responders to take the appropriate action for person(s) in danger. This is because they were able to locate the information needed as-fast-as-possible without any fuss or delay.

Now, I just wonder if people ever considered using a Tattoo for this case....

  • It's great that the question is resolved, but there is no need to repeat the same information both in the question and the answer - you can opt for one and delete the other. If the issue is resolved owing to an answer you can always mark that answer as accepted - it gives both you and the person who answered additional points (unless the answer you accepted is your own). – Lucky Feb 11 '17 at 16:27
  • @Lucky, The reason why I posted 2-of-the-same-answers is for re-assurance. It's a whole lot easier to view the answer when it's closer to you. If I was on a mobile device the answer wouldn't be too far from me; therefore, reducing the time it takes to swipe up and down. P.S.: You never know when your in a hurry and when you are it's usually the case that the answer isn't easily accessible -- GUARANTEED. – fohrums Feb 13 '17 at 9:06

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