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Is there any scientific evidence that orgasm can be achieved by stimulating the prostate?

The 2023 article "Atlas of the Experience of Receptive Anal Sex in People with a Prostate" states:

While many debates exist regarding the existence and relationship of the “g spot” for men (most often associated with the prostate), there is no conclusive empirical evidence to suggest that the prostate is indeed responsible for these heightened sensations.

In the 2017 review "Prostate-induced orgasms: A concise review illustrated with a highly relevant case study" wrote (added to the question, but this review was already in the answer):

Because there have been no published laboratory-conducted investigations of the orgasms induced by prostate stimulation alone, information about them has to be gathered from the various websites dedicated to such orgasms. While unsatisfactory in that the vast number are obviously anecdotal they represent the only available source

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ca.23006

A related topic is covered in another source:

Sexual Behavior Problems and Management

Nathaniel McConaghy

In homosexual relations, most men do not reach orgasm in receptive anal intercourse, and a number report not reaching orgasm by any method in many of their sexual relationships, which they nevertheless enjoy.

https://www.google.ru/books/edition/Sexual_Behavior/eVD0BwAAQBAJ?hl=ru&gbpv=1&dq=In+homosexual+relations,+most+men+do+not+reach+orgasm+in+receptive+anal+intercourse,+and+a+number+report+not+reaching+orgasm+by+any+method+in&pg=PA186&printsec=frontcover

Are there scientific studies with contrary conclusions?

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    Where did you look? Did Masters & Johnson ever study the question? We require more than just "I didn't find any evidence."
    – Carey Gregory
    Apr 1, 2023 at 16:30
  • Where and how exactly did they prove it? The question should be read more carefully.
    – ggk hj
    Apr 1, 2023 at 16:51
  • As far as I know, prostate massage stopped being a mainstream treatment back in the 1960s because it can be harmful
    – ggk hj
    Apr 1, 2023 at 17:08
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    I didn't say anybody proved anything. I'm asking what research you did and where. This site requires questions to demonstrate some degree of prior research, and that means more than just saying you can't find any information. So what I asked is where did you look? Masters and Johnson would be my first destination for a question like this.
    – Carey Gregory
    Apr 1, 2023 at 18:21
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    Could you add that detail to the body of the question as comments are ephemeral: "important information from the original author should be edited into the question". Apr 1, 2023 at 20:39

1 Answer 1

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According to Prostate-induced orgasms: A concise review illustrated with a highly relevant case study, it appears there is no scientific evidence supporting or refuting the existence of prostate-induced orgasm, or at least there wasn't in 2017.

Because there have been no published laboratory-conducted investigations of the orgasms induced by prostate stimulation alone, information about them has to be gathered from the various websites dedicated to such orgasms. While unsatisfactory in that the vast number are obviously anecdotal they represent the only available source.

However, the anecdotal evidence seems compelling:

Unlike the sparsity of academic literature on prostate-induced orgasms there appears to be an enormous number of internet sites involving such activity.

My own searches using similar but not identical search terms confirms there are a large number of people out there who claim to be able to induce orgasm with prostate stimulation. The paper I cited includes a detailed case history of one such man. Frankly, I see no reason not to believe them, or at least the ones who aren't selling something.

And a paper does exist [Do men have a G-spot JF Perry - Aust Forum, 1988] that claims men have an area functionally similar to the G-spot in women, and it is located where the prostate is located. Unfortunately, even though the paper is widely cited I can't find a copy, not even the abstract.

Perry (1988) suggested that this area of the rectal wall was similar to the so-called ‘G-spot’ of the female in that it activated orgasm when stimulated so it has been called ‘the male G-spot’, it is anatomically incorrect but a widely used description.

So the answer to your question appears to be there is little, if any, scientific evidence supporting the notion of prostate-induced orgasms.

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    Importantly, in that paper you reference they mention the possibility of direct nerve stimulation; in other words, it's not really the prostate but a nerve running in the vicinity. The distinction isn't necessarily important, but it would support a mechanism.
    – Bryan Krause
    Apr 2, 2023 at 0:21
  • Yes, I relied on this article as well. But I wondered if the situation had changed since 2017.
    – ggk hj
    Apr 2, 2023 at 6:56
  • But I see reasons not to trust them. At least when this type of orgasm is unprovenly issued as characteristic of most men. Moreover, it can be harmful and dangerous. Healthcare providers do not recommend prostate massage as a treatment. Massage can be even more dangerous when performed by a non-professional for the sake of pleasure.
    – ggk hj
    Apr 2, 2023 at 7:52
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    Wait, you knew about this article and yet refused to add it to your question when I asked you for prior research? What you did add doesn't address the issue. If you read this article you know that achieving orgasm through prostate massage takes quite a bit of time, more time than anal intercourse typically involves. You seem to be more on a mission to prove that thousands of people are lying for no particular reason than actually learning the truth.
    – Carey Gregory
    Apr 2, 2023 at 15:31
  • Suppose some of those who make such claims are not lying. From the very beginning, I indicated that I do not deny this 100%. The source I provided is about men having anal sex in homosexual relationships. I think they are well aware of how long it takes to achieve orgasm, and what needs to be done for this. And these claims are already beginning to irritate.
    – ggk hj
    Apr 2, 2023 at 18:01

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