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When suffering from some tendinopathy, how to distinguish whether the pain comes from a non-inflammatory tendinopathy (a.k.a tendinosis) or from an inflammatory tendinopathy (a.k.a. tendinitis)?

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Basically, something falls under the classification of "inflammed" based on the following five criteria:

  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Heat
  • Pain
  • Loss of Function

If any of these apply to your tendinopathy, then it is probably tendinitis. Otherwise, it's probably non-inflammatory.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, wouldn't non-inflammatory tendinopathy also case pain? – Franck Dernoncourt Mar 31 '15 at 23:10
  • I think I was being misleading when I mentioned overuse in the previous question I answered. I quickly looked it up, tennis elbow is actually classified as a tendinosis. Essentially, pain is simply a sense that you feel when nociceptors are activated, whether you receive a cut or punch a wall. Inflammation is simply an autoimmune reaction that involves pain, but it's not the only thing that can cause pain. – Alex Chern Mar 31 '15 at 23:18

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