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The Question
Re - Covid-19 - Mandatory vaccination - In countries with mandatory vaccination, what is the logic behind not checking for antibodies in individuals, before requiring the vaccination of those individuals ?

  • In other words, why not give individuals who do not want to be vaccinated, the option of having an antibody test first, and using that test to determine if their vaccination is absolutely necessary .

It is regularly mentioned on media that many individuals who have been previously infected, have a higher immunity to being reinfected, or less symptoms .

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  • You would have to ask the governing officials in those countries what their logic is. This isn't a medical science question; it's a political question. The better question here would be something along the lines of whether antibody-based tests can verify immunity and to what degree. Also, we require questions here to demonstrate some degree of prior research, so you need to provide a source to back up claims like those who were previously infected have higher immunity.
    – Carey Gregory
    Nov 21, 2021 at 0:07
  • Should I clarify the question by inserting "what is the medical science logic" ....................., which is what I mean by posting the question in 'Medical Sciences' .
    – infomtn
    Nov 21, 2021 at 0:20
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    @infomtn No, you can't fix the question by just adding some trivial text like that. The question needs to be about medical science, not the decisions made by politicians. We don't know why they made the decisions they made and whether any of them were based on science at all. And let's get back to the prior research problem. You say it's regularly mentioned in the press that previous infections confer more immunity than... something. Give us an example of such an article. We can't address things we haven't seen.
    – Carey Gregory
    Nov 21, 2021 at 5:22
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    To add to @CareyGregory 's last comment - Which press (quote + link please)? Do you know their sources? Are those sources scientifically valid? What's the current scientific consensus on protection via infection and how long that lasts for COVID? - all pretty easily searchable things.
    – bob1
    Nov 23, 2021 at 3:56
  • Carey Gregory : It’s pretty clear that an implicit premise in this question is that the humoral presence of neutralizing antibodies to a pathogen is highly predictive of immunity. This has been so basic of a concept In medicine for over 50 years now, that no one really talked about it prior to 15 minutes ago when people started making up reasons for you to take this vaccine. This is a valid question. And you’re missing the point of it (cause you’re brainwashed). Sorry. nature.com/articles/s41591-021-01377-8
    – froimovi
    Jan 14 at 4:19

1 Answer 1

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There is no good medical argument for this. It's routine with some (pre-CoViD-19) vaccines to test for antibodies prior to vaccination where patient history is uncertain, or after vaccination to ensure non-responders can be revaccinated and retested. With millions who have recovered from CoViD-19, it appears that immunity due to recovery from infection is longer lasting and at least as effective.

If there was such a sound medical argument for this, I think I'd have heard about it, figured it out, or both, or someone will provide one here, as I've seen the question you ask raised many times, and have yet to hear an answer grounded in virology, epidemiology, etc... Dr Fauci was asked essentially this question on TV and didn't provide an answer.
Sanjay Gupta (CNN) asked Fauci on December 4, with Anderson Cooper (CNN) in frame, about the large Israeli study suggesting natural immunity provides much better protection than the vaccines alone. Fauci responded that he didn't have a firm answer on that-we (meaning NIH/NIAID) have to discuss the durability. With millions who have recovered from CoViD-19, it appears that immunity due to recovery from infection is longer lasting and more effective, compared to every vaccine available.Israeli National Study Reveals Natural Immunity Durability Appears Superior to 2-Dose Vaccination, but Hybrid Immunity Trumps All May 2021, a third of the U.S. population, estimated at 44% of adults aged 18-50, had already been infected, suggests Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data.

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    You state that infection provides equally good protection that is longer lasting. You need to provide a citation for that claim.
    – Carey Gregory
    Dec 14, 2021 at 23:43
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    It's also rather unusual to test for antibodies before giving a vaccine. It increases cost, delays the vaccine, and in most cases offers no benefit. So your statement that there is no good medical reason could use a citation too.
    – Carey Gregory
    Dec 14, 2021 at 23:46
  • First one - sure. Will. Re the second - Sorry, are you saying the average medical benefit is negative for the vaccines for which it is routine to test for antibodies prior to vaccination? Dec 14, 2021 at 23:52
  • Odd. It seems someone voted this down within seconds of me posting the above comment. Dec 14, 2021 at 23:54
  • By May 2021, over a third of the U.S. population, estimated at 44% of adults aged 18-50, had already been infected, suggests Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data... Dec 15, 2021 at 0:17

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