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I find conflicting info on this CDC cite it says

Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food

next it says

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth,

So can't the food I eat act as a surface which has covid on it because someone sneezed on it?

PS even this says you can't get it from foods based on that CDC article, but what about the conflicting info I am referring to?

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  • Sure it can, it's that it's hard to prove such cases happen as you describe, since in such circumstance they'll also breathe in your face or at least in proximity... There's been a lot of expert debate on whether aerosols or the larger spit/sneeze particles are the main factor... insofar somewhat inconclusive medpagetoday.com/special-reports/exclusives/92564
    – Fizz
    Aug 31 at 15:17
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There is no conflict.

Currently there is no evidence

means there is no evidence. It doesn't mean there is evidence against, it means that there is no evidence. They don't know of a person who has caught COVID-19 through food that was not exposed in some other way. The lack of evidence is suggestive that this isn't a major route of spread, though.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object

means it may be possible. Evidence for this possibility might include swabbing surfaces and finding you can culture the virus from those swabs. There are other viruses (particularly those causing gastrointestinal illness, norovirus for example) that transmit often through a hand-to-mouth route. However, you're missing the end of the sentence in seeing a conflict:

this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

In summary, there is no evidence (no known cases of spread) COVID-19 transmits through food, and although there is a hypothetical possibility it isn't thought to be particularly important from an epidemiological standpoint.

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