1

Conventional wisdom says that when there's "a bug going around", such as the common cold, you can isolate and wait it out – it will eventually stop spreading through the community. To what degree is this common perception correct? To the extent it is correct, is this a highly localized example of herd immunity? If not, what's happening here?

I have done some looking around online, but unfortunately nothing meaningful came up in my searches; every article seemed more interested in large-scale and long-term applications of the concept.

6
  • 1
    Welcome to Medical Sciences! Please take the tour and read the help center. For reasons mentioned in this post and in How to Ask, we require prior research information when asking questions. See this list of helpful resources. Please help us to help you and edit your question to provide more information on what you have read on this subject, what made you ask this question, and any problems you are having understanding your research. If you found nothing, what did you Google? – Carey Gregory Jun 11 at 0:11
  • 1
    No, it's clear enough, but we require questions here to demonstrate at least some degree of research effort on your part. For example, did you google this question? What did you find? And what about herd immunity? Does that apply to all diseases or just viral? We don't require extensive research, just enough to show that you're not just being lazy and asking us to do trivial research for you. One or two links are usually sufficient. – Carey Gregory Jun 12 at 22:11
  • 1
    @CareyGregory With all due respect, the link you provide which suggests this lists it as a "tip", not a "rule". I did some looking around, but I was not able to find any relevant resources, so there are no links to provide. I'm extremely put off by the deep suspicion implicit in asking users to prove that they googled something, and I think I will decline to act on that tip. – Colin P. Hill Jun 14 at 12:07
  • 1
    I'm afraid it is a rule, so you might want to learn how stackexchange works. There's no "deep suspicion" and you're going to find the same requirement on almost all the science and academic sites. By the same token, people who answer your question will be required to provide supporting references. If you find those requirements too burdensome, then SE might not be the place for you. – Carey Gregory Jun 14 at 15:17
  • 1
    I didn't insinuate you don't understand how SE works because you can't find a word. What I meant was if you don't understand that guidelines ("rules") are created by a consensus in the site's meta forum -- no matter how small that might be -- then you don't understand how SE works. I do apologize if my comment felt insulting. I did not intend it to be so. – Carey Gregory Jun 16 at 4:13