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Why not inject an antibiotic locally (directly into a lesion, ensuring it penetrates the matrix due to an efficient and effective dosage being administered in the right location)? I have done a fair bit of research, yet I have found nothing supporting the idea of delivering antibiotics using this method, which has to be better than invasive surgery.

Why not just inject a saline solution containing chemicals or biomolecules that break down these matrices to reduce resistance to antimicrobial drugs and increase efficacy of treatment where the bacteria are (1)colonised in a non-planktonic state, (2)located externally, anatomically, and are, thus, targetable in such a way.

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    It's okay to refine your question and make it more specific, but generally isn't good to keep moving the goalposts on your questions. It breaks the SE model to invalidate answers by changing the question.
    – Bryan Krause
    Jun 4 at 0:15
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    The responses you've gotten to this question come from two highly qualified individuals who most likely know the literature far better than you. There is no "more speculation" here. You seem determined to get the answer you're looking for rather than the correct answer.
    – Carey Gregory
    Jun 4 at 0:48
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    @Ben You won't find a lot of literature on things that aren't close to working. When people publish studies on failures, it's usually failures of things that they really really thought would work and had a lot of evidence they would work. Things that don't work at all never make it that far.
    – Bryan Krause
    Jun 4 at 2:01
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    Some aspects of your edited question trivialize the problems here that I tried to already address in my answer. You write, "ensuring it penetrates the matrix due to an efficient and effective dosage" - okay, well, "efficient and effective" isn't just a dial you can crank up to "ensure" anything. "Why not just inject a saline solution containing chemicals or biomolecules" - you'd have to first decide what those "chemicals or biomolecules" are - that's the first hard part, and the second hard part is even once you find them, they might not have the effect you thought they would.
    – Bryan Krause
    Jun 4 at 2:07
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    @Ben It's pretty clear you're not interested in any answer that doesn't fit your confirmation bias.
    – Carey Gregory
    Jun 4 at 3:40

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I think you are imagining a biofilm to be like castle walls; once you've breached the walls, you have free access to the inside.

A biofilm is more like a gelatin dessert. Even if you have a biofilm that is large enough to inject into, it will still be a barrier to free movement of the drug.

There certainly is interest in local antibiotic delivery, the simplest of which is topical application, but it won't work quite the way I think you're envisioning it.

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  • I get what you're saying, but I invisioned an injection rupturing the cells of half of the bacteria, and rendering their defences useless. I was imagining injecting a lesion of around 1 cubic centemetre 4 to 5 times.
    – Ben
    Jan 23, 2021 at 20:10
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    @Ben I suspect that would result in a lot of inflammation rather than resolving any infection. A normal injection just won't lyse a bunch of bacterial cells like that. You're pretty much talking about a surgical intervention at that point, so why not just excise the lesion?
    – Bryan Krause
    Jan 23, 2021 at 20:12
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    Drainage (plus antibiotics) is preferable to excision. Excision is done only if the abscess is recurrent or has caused a hard, painful residual lesion of scar tissue. Well, a life threatening deep abscess might be surgically removed, but even deep abscess are usually aspirated and antibiotics given before removal to prevent spread of the organism. Jun 3 at 16:26
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    @anongoodnurse Yes thank you. I tried to explain to Dr Krause that this is a somewhat premature theory. My question is more speculative; I am not requiring medical assistance.
    – Ben
    Jun 3 at 21:35
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    @Ben - your edit doesn’t change the correct answer; antibiotics delivered through blood (I.e. oral or IV) will diffuse through tissue much better and more thoroughly than any local injections. Topical antibiotics are used for topical infections (eg impetigo/fungi). Intradermal antibiotics have the potential for a host of nasty complications. Jun 4 at 0:15

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