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As you may know, there are medical devices to track things to some certain points, like glucometers. Question is why do we strive to track such things (take glucose level for example) more accurately? (Curious: Talking specifically about this particular subject(glucometers), what's the reason to actually crave for precision?

these are a few sources I’ve been reading recently:

https://engineering.mit.edu/engage/ask-an-engineer/how-do-glucometers-work/

This article shows different approaches to measure the glucose level with different mechanisms with different level of accuracy and efficacy; using enzymatic detection, using photonics, and using carbon nanotubes.

Also this book

https://www.sciencedirect.com/book/9780857096609/nanosensors-for-chemical-and-biological-applications

in chapter 2,

[Electrochemical nanosensors for blood glucose analysis]

discusses the detection of glucose using various approaches like again enzymatic detection, Nanosensors, Nano-sized materials like carbon nanotubes, gold nanowire array electrode for non-enzymatic voltammetric and amperometric glucose detection and...

And also the last one : Nanophotonics Paras N. Prasad Page 268-269 glucose detection using photonic crystal sensors

https://www.fulviofrisone.com/attachments/article/406/Nanophotonics_0471649880.pdf

(I asked this question just out of curiosity)

"why bother improving the accuracy of glucometers?" I'm saying that, with the typical glucometer devices, we are able to measure the glucose level in the bloodstream and with some more advanced methods(or maybe alternative ways), we are trying to make the measurement more accurate. Question is why, while we are already able to measure it. I mean is there a medical condition that there is a need to measure with higher accuracy than the typical glucometers?

Pt: I don't come from a medical background,so my question may sound a little bit obscure.

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  • I'm not sure I understand your question. Are you asking why measuring devices are made to be as accurate as practical?
    – Carey Gregory
    Dec 24 '20 at 1:00
  • Sorry I couldn't ask my question any better. I was referring to the fact that we actually are already ABLE to measure the glucose level in the blood to some extent, but why do we want to measure it even more accurately? I mean, the same methodology applies to the other devices as well, they have some specific usage and are already doing SOMETHING and reasonably practical compared to what we want.My question is why should we try perfecting them while we are able to get what we want (for example measuring glucose level in the blood) This is a BME student asking this question.
    – user668687
    Dec 24 '20 at 8:21
  • I'm still not clear on what you're asking. Please take the tour and read the help center. For reasons mentioned in this post and in How to Ask, we require questions here to demonstrate some degree of prior research. For example, can you cite the sources that lead you to believe there's an effort underway to measure glucose more accurately? (And apparently other medical measurements as well?) Can you also explain your reasoning that what we have is "good enough?"
    – Carey Gregory
    Dec 24 '20 at 16:24
  • Yeah looks like I need to have a look there. Btw Yeah, these are a few sources I’ve been reading recently: engineering.mit.edu/engage/ask-an-engineer/… This article shows different approaches to measure the glucose level with different mechanisms with different level of accuracy and efficacy; using enzymatic detection, using photonics, and using carbon nanotubes.
    – user668687
    Dec 24 '20 at 19:10
  • Also this book[ sciencedirect.com/book/9780857096609/… ] contains a full chapter [Electrochemical nanosensors for blood glucose analysis] discussing the detection of glucose using various approaches like again enzymatic detection, Nanosensors, Nano-sized materials like carbon nanotubes, gold nanowire array electrode for non-enzymatic voltammetric and amperometric glucose detection and ….
    – user668687
    Dec 24 '20 at 19:11

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