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5HT3 Inhibitors are antiemetics, such as Mirtazapine. See here and here

The serotonin modulator vortioxetine is such an inhibitor, and the most common side effect is nausea, in 3 it says that it has a 5HT3-inhibitor effect.

I am confused. Can someone explain the contradiction between explanations?

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  • In what monograph? – Thomas Jul 9 '20 at 19:28
  • Product monograph is the paper about the medicine distributed by the manufacturer – kouty Jul 10 '20 at 0:50
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Its primary action is as NaSSA (a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant), not as 5-HT3 inhibitor. If you have a look at e. g. the Wikipedia page (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirtazapine#Pharmacodynamics), you will see that nausea is listed as side effect under "discontinuation syndrome", i. e. sudden withdrawal from continuous 5-HT3 blocking. As a side note, it also has H1-blocking effects, which are antiemetic as well.

There are more withdrawal symptoms listed here: https://www.nami.org/About-Mental-Illness/Treatments/Mental-Health-Medications/Types-of-Medication/Mirtazapine-(Remeron)

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    Thanks but if you read more, you can see that it's used as an antiemetic for chemotherapy side effects because of its 3ht3a antagonist property – kouty Jul 10 '20 at 0:53
  • Read more where? – Thomas Jul 10 '20 at 17:49
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    See edit of the question – kouty Jul 11 '20 at 19:04
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I was mistaken, the 5HT3 inhibitor of Vortioxetine is not responsible for the nausea, see here

Its additional antagonism of 5-HT3 receptors may partly counteract gastrointestinal adverse effects but nausea has an important role on drug discontinuation.

Its additional antagonism of 5-HT3 receptors may partly counteract gastrointestinal adverse effects but nausea has an important role on drug discontinuation.

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    It may be that my answer said just that. – Thomas Jul 11 '20 at 22:49
  • If it's the case I will remove immediately my answer but please make it clearer – kouty Jul 12 '20 at 2:30

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