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A 2015 study reported that

We have shown previously that noroviruses are destroyed on copper alloy surfaces. In this new study, human coronavirus 229E was rapidly inactivated on a range of copper alloys (within a few minutes for simulated fingertip contamination) and Cu/Zn brasses were very effective at lower copper concentration. Exposure to copper destroyed the viral genomes and irreversibly affected virus morphology, including disintegration of envelope and dispersal of surface spikes. Cu(I) and Cu(II) moieties were responsible for the inactivation, which was enhanced by reactive oxygen species generation on alloy surfaces, resulting in even faster inactivation than was seen with nonenveloped viruses on copper. Consequently, copper alloy surfaces could be employed in communal areas and at any mass gatherings to help reduce transmission of respiratory viruses from contaminated surfaces and protect the public health.

A more recent study (published March 17) on SARS-CoV-2 found among other things (as reported in the press)

On plastic and stainless steel, viable virus could be detected after three days.

On cardboard, the virus was not viable after 24 hours.

On copper, it took four hours for the virus to become inactivated.

Have these observations about copper been used/incorporated in any public health measures (not necessarily relating to the COVID-19 outbreak)?

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