3

It appears to be dreadfully not uncommon that seemingly healthy people suddenly die of "cardiac events" when doing physical exercises. Here is just another sad example: a healthy and regularly running man dies at the finish of his 5km run. Just several weeks before his health was assessed by a doctor who did not find any issues.

What kind of modern medical examinations can be taken to assess/predict the risk of such bad luck for a 39-year old guy living a reasonably healthy lifestyle?

  • 1
    A healthy lifestyle has many benefits, but unfortunately it does not prevent 100% of disease. This is a good question. Perhaps if I have some time later I'll write something up. Generally, though, I would not call these events common at all. They are quite rare, causing less than 1 death per million person years as an overall population rate, if i recall. They are tragic, and unexpected (by definition), though, so they are memorable and often reported in the news. – De Novo Mar 12 '19 at 16:41
  • 1
    @DeNovo makes a good point about the news. I think the press contributes to the impression that such deaths are "dreadfully not uncommon" because they're notable news events solely because they're so rare. Add another 10 years to that man and he would never have made the news. – Carey Gregory Mar 13 '19 at 1:47
  • 1
    It's difficult because hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is extremely difficult to distinguish from athletic heart syndrome which is simply the remodeling of the heart to become a lot stronger. In the latter case you've a super healthy heart, while in the former case you're at risk from dropping dead while exercising. But since HCM is extremely rare, I'm going to assume that I have the latter condition (resting heart rate about 36 BPM) and not bother worrying about HCM :) . – Count Iblis Mar 14 '19 at 7:31