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Where can I find a (reasonably) reliable guide on supplements?

I found this here not sure if it's any good.

https://www.reddit.com/r/coolguides/comments/8h5bw7/do_health_supplements_really_work/

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    Here is the website of the U.S. NIH Office of Dietary Supplements. I just happened to look up Vitamin C. There is a consumer version too. ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminC-HealthProfessional – Gordon Dec 16 '18 at 1:05
  • I won't say that this should be the sum total and end of your research, but there are certainly worse places to get started than this one. – Gordon Dec 16 '18 at 1:07
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    Even if you find that some supplement may be good for you and your unique health status, you still should go back periodically and review the things you may be taking to make sure you keep up with further studies, new conclusions, etc. – Gordon Dec 16 '18 at 1:12
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I consider a guide about dietary supplements reasonably reliable if it is based on recent systematic reviews of studies that agree with each other and does not push supplements to healthy people.

The following sources can be beneficial for you if you know what do you want to know: Do potassium supplements lower blood pressure, do calcium supplements cause kidney stones...?

If you only have vague questions, like, do I need any supplements or which brands are the best, this will not likely help you.

Quick info:

Evidence-based, easy-to-read:

Safety:

Vegetarian:

Reviews of studies:

Databases:

  • Institute of Medicine: Dietary Reference Intakes for vitamins, minerals, carbs, fiber, proteins, fat and water
  • US Department of Agriculture (USDA.gov) enables searching 1) by foods - to show their detailed nutrient composition, 2) by nutrients - to show which foods have most of a certain nutrient.

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