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I had strong pains in the gum. After several months I went to a periodontist. He said I had inflammation in my gums, and then gave me a complex treatment, but the pains remained.

After several more months, I followed advice from my wife, and started treating my mouth with salt. After several days of salting, the pains disappeared!

However, the periodontist still says I have inflammation, and have to go through the treatment again.

Now, I am not sure who to believe... the dentist, or my mouth (and my wife)?

So my question is: can regular salt-washing be a good cure for gum inflammation?

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    Relief from pain does not indicate a cure. Stop rinsing and the pain will return. – Carey Gregory Aug 5 '15 at 15:29
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You should thank your wife 1 million times for the cure that she suggested for you.

The fact that the pain has gone, is probably related to the type of bacteria that caused the inflammation. Common salt is a mineral composed primarily of sodium chloride (NaCl), and there are some types of bacteria that cannot tolerate high concentrations of sodium chloride (NaCl) (These bacteria are called : Non-halophilic bacteria), hence, salt is the perfect way to get rid of non-halophilic bacteria. In addition, I've been using salt-washing everytime I have toothache, and this works for me.

And my answer is YES, salt-washing is a good cure for gum inflammation.

These articles dealing with such pain (Gum pain, toothache..) remedies, include SALT as a remedy :

1/ Treat Gum Disease With Homemade Remedies

2/ How to Reduce Pain of Gum Disease

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    Although a salt water rinse will kill some bacteria, it can only reach bacteria at or very near the surface. Deeper bacteria, where most of the underlying infection actually resides, will be unaffected. This is why his periodontist said the treatment needs to continue. Salt also draws fluid out of tissue it comes into contact with through osmosis. This has the temporary effect of reducing swelling, which in turn has the effect of reducing pain. Although it is an effective relief from pain, it does not and cannot cure the infection. – Carey Gregory Aug 5 '15 at 15:23
  • Personally, If I have toothache or gum pain, I don't take any painkiller drugs, I just put directly a pinch of non-dissolved salt on the surface of the inflammation 3 times a day, and let it do its action. The infection and the pain it comes with disappear totally! And I don't know if this works for other people. :) – HealthLove Aug 5 '15 at 16:49
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    It might help speed the healing of some infections, and it can definitely relieve pain caused by swelling, but in all likelihood the healing would have happened just as fast without it. The real question is why you're experiencing toothaches and gum pain in the first place. Those aren't common maladies for people who maintain proper dental hygiene and dental care. – Carey Gregory Aug 5 '15 at 19:19

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